Sourcing High Quality Wood

Sourcing High Quality WoodThere’s something about real wooden furniture that seems rather homey, don’t you think? I enjoy having the stuff decorate my home and making an occasional piece of furniture is actually a hobby of mine. It’s fairly cheap for me now since I have the tools for working the wood on my end and I know where to get the materials for cheap too. Sourcing high quality wood is probably to main concern for most people who want to try and build their own furniture, so that’s what I’ll talk about today. There are a handful of different places to find real wood, so I’ll list a few here.

The first resource I found is actually pretty reliable, though you might have to go through some hassle to really utilize it. People who own land, especially land with trees on it, might just be looking for someone to remove some of that wood. Now whether you’d have to rent said land and pay a fee, or if the owner would actually pay you to come chop down and haul off some of the trees, I can’t say for sure. That’s going to vary based on the landholder with whom you are dealing. But most countries are packed with people who own land and want it cleared for one reason or another, making this a great wood source.

Processing a whole log, or sections of a log, is another story. It also brings me to my next reliable source for high quality wood. Whether you find it and bring it in yourself, or purchase something directly from the people with the right machines, like these, you’ll need to get your wood split up to make it easier for you to work with. Remember, you’re not looking to carve your next chair from a single log of wood – or maybe you are. But if you are, there are probably better guides out there on the ‘net for your specific needs.

Splitting the logs to be worked on chops them up into smaller, more manageable pieces, which makes cutting other pieces out of those significantly easier. Sawing planks off half a log with a face which is already pretty clean is much simpler than trying to do the same right through the bark layer, which could lead to massive cracks and fissures that make most of the log unusable. In my opinion though, it’s important to remember that the roughest work is always done first. For this you might even consider looking at Log Splitter Pro to look for decent machines you could rent elsewhere.

Of course, a splitter is just the start. You’ll need saws, vises, rulers and more to assure accurate cuts. You’ll need a hammer, different kinds of nails and maybe even a set of drivers and screws to secure together the various pieces of wood you want to use to make your furniture. And last but certainly not least, you’ll need the tools for all the finer, finishing work, like sanders, primer, sealant and paint, if you’re going to be using any.

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